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Apolipoprotein B100

Definition

Apolipoprotein B100 (apo B100) is a protein that plays a role in moving cholesterol around your body. It is a form of low density lipoprotein (LDL).

This article discusses the test used to measure the level of apoB100 in the blood.

Alternative Names

ApoB100; Apoprotein B100

How the test is performed

A blood sample is needed.

How to prepare for the test

Your health care provider may tell you not to eat or drink anything for 4 - 6 hours before the test.

How the test will feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, you may feel moderate pain, or only a prick or stinging sensation. Afterward, there may be some throbbing.

Why the test is performed

Most often, this test is done to help determine the cause or specific type of hyperlipidemia.

Normal Values

The normal range is 50 - 150 mg/dL.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some laboratories use different measurements or may test different specimens. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What abnormal results mean

An abnormal result may mean you have high lipid levels (hyperlipidemia).

Other disorders that may be associated with high apoB100 levels include angina pectoris and heart attack.

What the risks are

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling light-headed
  • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)
  • Multiple punctures to locate veins

Special considerations

Apolipoprotein measurements may provide more detail about your risk for heart disease, but the added value of this test beyond a lipid panel is unknown.

References

Genest J, Libby P. Lipoprotein disorders and cardiovascular disease. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA:Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 47.

 Semenkovich, CF. Disorders of lipid metabolism. In: GoldmanL, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 213.


Review Date: 6/4/2012
Reviewed By: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc. David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.
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